Valentina Pasquali

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Valentina Pasquali

Valentina Pasquali is a freelance journalist. Her writing and photography have appeared in Foreign Policy Magazine, The Washington Post, Global Post, National Public Radio, D-La Repubblica delle Donne, among others. Over the course of the past several years, she has reported from Haiti, Italy, the US, Turkey, Indonesia, Nepal, France and China, writing for both US- and Itay-based publications. She has been writing about American politics since the 2004 Presidential Elections.

This author wrote:

La comunità internazionale e il Consiglio di Sicurezza di fronte alle cattive opzioni coreane

Il Consiglio di Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unite ha approvato all’unanimità la settimana scorsa nuove sanzioni sulla Corea del Nord, l’11 settembre – dunque appena un mese dopo un’altra Risoluzione che imponeva simili restrizioni commerciali e finanziarie sul regime di Kim Jong-un...

China through the American prism

China’s economic and financial troubles over the last several months, combined with its growing weight on the international stage, make this country a sensitive focus point in the United States. The ongoing Presidential campaign has spurred all sorts of provocative anti-Beijing talk, both on the left and on the right. However, American officials take a more cautious view...

Clinton and Trump: the frontrunners who still can’t unify their parties

Although they have been described as widely unpredictable and changeable, the 2016 US presidential primaries already seem set on their course only a month and a half since kicking off in Iowa. Yet, in one of this year’s many paradoxes, their final outcome is still uncertain, particularly on the Republican front...

A clearer path in the 2016 presidential race

After running on parallel tracks for several weeks, the Democratic and Republican primaries diverged on Super Tuesday to go each in its own direction. While the Grand old party (Gop) accelerated toward a Donald Trump train wreck, the Democratic establishment put the brakes on the insurgent campaign of Bernie Sanders...

Obama and Netanyahu: the friendship that never was

It is well known that the nearly overlapping administrations of President Barack Obama in the United States and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Israel have marked a low point in the relations between the two allies...

The Supreme Court and Bloomberg factors toward “Super Tuesday”

As if this race for the White House wasn’t erratic enough already, the unexpected death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia – a staunch conservative – on February 13th threw yet another wrench in the works. Suddenly, at stake in 2016 is the entirety of the US government, each of its legislative, executive and judicial branches...

Two primary rounds and still many hopefuls

With the first two election contests of 2016 now in the bag, the outcome of this rollercoaster of a race for the White House remains as hard to predict as ever. Those who were looking to the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary for answers have been sorely disappointed. In the democratic camp, the fight between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders is nowhere near a resolution...

When voters have a say: Iowa and New Hampshire

After nearly a year of what already feels like a very long campaign season, the 2016 presidential election is finally about to get on its way in the United States. As voters in Iowa and New Hampshire gear up for back-to-back primary contests, respectively on February 1st and 9th, two big questions hover over the vote: will Hillary Clinton manage to fend off Bernie Sanders' offensive?...

The 2016 State of the Union: Obama’s legacy and the future

In his final State of the Union address, an upbeat US President Barack Obama looked far into the future while circling back to the past, to his winning campaign message from eight years ago of “change we can believe in.” To do so, he largely, if not entirely, departed from the standard laundry-list format and st...

Thinking beyond the BRICs and avoiding the acronyms’ trap

Until it was all well and good there was general acceptance around the world of what the acronym BRIC meant. Coined by the then-chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management Jim O’Neill in a 2001 paper titled “Building Better Global Economic BRICs”, the term referred to Brazil, Russia, India and China (the capital S for South Africa was added in 2010)...