Jacob Parakilas

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Jacob Parakilas

Jacob Parakilas is assistant head of the US and the Americas Programme at Chatham House, London. He previously worked for Action on Armed Violence, the World Security Institute, the Arms Control Association and the US Department of Homeland Security. His research has largely focused on American foreign policy and international security issues. Originally from Lewiston, Maine, Jacob holds a PhD in International Relations from the London School of Economics.

This author wrote:

Generals and businesspeople at the heart of the US administration: why this is a problem

One of the defining features of the Trump’s administration is its heavy reliance on figures from business and the military. While this approach feeds into the president’s self-directed “outsider” narrative, cutting out civilian public sector expertise does not just weaken the government in the long term – it also creates problems for the current administration...

Donald Trump and the strategic value of unorthodox political behavior

It’s been nearly two years since Donald Trump boarded the golden elevator in Trump Tower to kick off his presidential campaign. In that relatively short time, he has survived almost countless revelations and incidents that would have destroyed another candidate or another president...

Forecasting Trump’s foreign policy: Unpredictability with a chance of incoherence

As the first American president with no history of military or civilian public service, Donald Trump’s approach to the world would be somewhat unpredictable even in the calmest, most settled era...

Transitioning to the Trump presidency

By recent historical standards, Donald Trump’s transition is not moving any more slowly than previous ones. In 2008, many of Barack Obama’s major appointments weren’t made until well into December...

The final hours: What do the polls say, and does the margin matter?

With only hours left before we learn the outcome of the US elections, ever greater attention is being focused on the polls, with policy – hardly a central feature in the debate, despite huge differences between the two candidates – receding farther and farther into the background...

Clinton vs Trump, first debate: it’s the follow up that matters

There seems to be a fairly clear consensus in the wake of the first debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton on September 26 that her greater experience and preparation paid off. Trump seemed to hold his own at first, but as soon as the debate moved away from trade and the economy, the limits of his improvisational approach became clear...