Ivan Nechepurenko

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Ivan Nechepurenko

Ivan Nechepurenko is a Moscow reporter for the New York Times. He has worked for several think tanks and governmental organizations, including the International Crisis Group, OSCE and Carnegie Moscow Center. He has been a staff writer for the Moscow Times in 2013-2015 and also published his work in GQ, Slon.ru, and the Guardian, among other media outlets. He holds a Master’s of Science in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Twitter: @INechepurenko

 

This author wrote:

The ambivalent Russian soul

A century was not enough for Russia to absorb not only the effects, but the reasons for the 1917 Revolution. Both Russian society and government still lack a consensus on whether it was one of the greatest tragedies, or an idealistic and utopian leap forward that made Russia one of the two great superpowers of the 20th century...

The paradox of Russia’s weaknesses and Putin’s power

President Vladimir V. Putin is as confident as ever. After reaching record heights, his approval ratings are not budging...

Russia cherishes its role in the US election, and plays with fire

Speaking at the opening session of the newly-elected State Duma on Oct. 5, President Vladimir Putin quoted Russia’s famed pre-revolutionary Prime Minister Pyotr Stolypin who said that Russia has a “historically supreme right to be strong”. With regard to the ongoing presidential campaign in the United States, Putin sees this right being realized...

Russia, the G7/G8 and no looking back

The Russia of President Vladimir Putin will not seek re-admission into the Group of Seven (G7) industrialized nations just as the West will not invite it back. The other members of the former G8 expelled Moscow from the Group in 2014 (hence it went back to its previous G7 configuration) in response to the annexation of Crimea...

How a new leadership could emerge in Russia

The Russian opposition is a disoriented, closely-knit community of activists and leaders, many of whom have discredited themselves in recent years...

Putin’s goals in Syria and Russia’s longer-term interests

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s decision to deploy several dozen military aircraft and helicopters to Syria and set up a military base to maintain them was motivated by a set of interconnected aims and reasons. They can be separated into internal and external motivations for the sake of analysis, but the two are inextricably linked...

Russia’s crisis as an opportunity to break with the past

In the wake of the 2012 presidential election, President Vladimir Putin published an article in Russia's leading business daily, Vedomosti, on the economic policy he intended to pursue if the Russian people would let him serve another term in the Kremlin. Putin promised to launch a broad modernization of the Russian economy...

Toward a Sino-Russian entente: from Kaliningrad to Shanghai

As attempts to integrate Russia into the West have largely failed, culminating in the sharp rupture over Ukraine, the Kremlin feels it has no choice but to move toward China, something it is reluctant to admit in order to avoid being portrayed as weak...

Misunderstanding ordinary Russians and the failure of sanctions

Despite inflicting severe pain on the economy, and therefore on ordinary Russians, sanctions imposed by Western states on Moscow over the Ukraine crisis have had the opposite effect: instead of weakening the domestic power base of President Vladimir Putin thus forcing him to change his policy, they have enhanced his position as the central figure in the country...

China's clever neutrality over Ukraine and the evolution of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization

While the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) is promoted by Russia as a global counterweight to US hegemony, China - Moscow's main partner in the organization - is reluctant to openly engage in the great power rivalry. ...