Teun van Dongen

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Teun  van Dongen

Teun van Dongen is an independent national and international security expert and regularly writes about such topics as terrorism, insurgency and conflict. He worked at The Hague Centre for Strategic Studies for six years and has been seconded to the National Coordinator for Counterterrorism and Security. He holds a PhD degree from Leiden University, which he earned by writing a dissertation on counterterrorism effectiveness. For more information, see www.teunvandongen.com

This author wrote:

Spying through the microwave: intelligence gathering in an online world

Donald Trump’s advisor and spokesperson, Kellyanne Conway, raised eyebrows in March 2017 when she essentially accused former US President Barack Obama of spying on Donald Trump through a microwave...

The rise of the self-preserving jihadi: a different lesson from the terrorist attacks in Barcelona

After four days of confusion and contradictory reports, the Spanish authorities have finally pierced through the fog of war to identify the man who carried out the ghastly vehicle attack in Barcelona on August 17...

Lone terrorist attacks are impossible to prevent. Or are they?

Post-9/11 jihadist terrorism is rife with examples of the terrorist copycat effect. For instance, for some years after they were committed, the 2004 Madrid bombings served as a template for other terrorist attacks...

Leadership elimination and the challenge of degrading the Islamic State

Omar al-Shishani was one of the few widely known leaders of the Islamic State. A striking appearance with his long, reddish beard, pale skin and morose demeanor, he had a reputation for being a fierce and battle-hardened jihadi. Drawing on years of experience fighting the Russians in Chechnya, Al-Shishani made a substantial contribution to the military campaigns of the Islamic State...

The Islamic State’s terror tactics: no reason for panic

In the wake of the Orlando shooting, CIA Chief John Brennan spoke out on the nature of the terrorist threat...

Why the US and the UK are right in not paying ransoms to terrorists

There are few lies that have been exposed more often and more convincingly than government assertions that they never talk to terrorists. Almost every government says that negotiations with terrorists are out of the question, but few governments actually live by this principle...

US counterterrorism in Africa: low-profile, but risky

Even the most casual observer of US foreign policy has probably noticed that there is a certain reluctance in Washington to deploy US troops to fight enemies abroad...

Counterterrorism after Charlie Hebdo: change course or stay calm?

While the uproar caused by the shootings at the office of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo hasn’t even begun to recede, tough questions are being asked about the road ahead...

How proponents of NSA’s digital surveillance have won – for now

The December 9th release of the so-called “Torture Report” by the Senate Intelligence Committee is bound to influence, if only indirectly, the ongoing debate over the reform of the National Security Agency...

China’s counterterrorism policy – and why the Chinese will not confront the Islamic State

The list of countries that are bombing the Islamic State or arming the group’s enemies has grown steadily since the beginning of this year, but one major player remains conspicuously absent. China gets 10% of its oil imports from Iraq, and invested heavily in oil fields that are now under the control of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and his men...