Lorenzo Kamel

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Lorenzo Kamel

Lorenzo Kamel (PhD hab. Associate Professor) is a Marie Curie historian at the University of Freiburg’s Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS). He is also a Senior Fellow at IAI and an Associate at Harvard University’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES). He published seven books on Med and Middle Eastern affairs, including Imperial Perceptions of Palestine: British Influence and Power in Late Ottoman Times, winner of the 2016 “Palestine Book Award”.


Twitter: @lorenzokamel



This author wrote:

The dangers of homogenous entities: the Kurdish case

In the early 1990s, Bernard Lewis published an article entitled “Rethinking the Middle East” in Foreign Affairs...

“Guerra dei trent’anni” in Medio Oriente: un’analogia fuorviante

La Guerra dei trent'anni, iniziata come un conflitto tra gli stati cattolici e quelli protestanti del Sacro Romano Impero, dilaniò l’Europa centrale tra il 1618 e il 1648. Causò circa otto milioni di morti, in larga parte civili. Molti osservatori dell’odierno Medio Oriente hanno rintracciato analogie con quel lontano passato...

Israel and Palestine: mental borders, states and peoples

“People adapt their memories to suit their sufferings”, wrote Athenian historian Thucydides over two millennia ago. Since then the world has witnessed enormous changes. Yet, his words remain as powerful as ever. People continue to focus on some specific aspects of their past and present, while neglecting others, to address challenges and scars...

Between past and present: Israel’s internal debates

Recently Israel laid claim to nearly a thousand acres in the Etzion settlement bloc near Bethlehem. The area has been designated “state land” by the military-run civil administration (the new settlement of Givat Hamatos,[1] between Gilo and Bethlehem, will possibly be established within this area)...

Il cliché di un Iraq artificiale e diviso

“Gertrude d’Arabia, la donna che ha inventato l’Iraq”. Questo il titolo di un recente articolo pubblicato da Clive Irving su The Daily Beast...

Women’s role in Egypt and a changing society

Khulthum Odeh (1892-1965) is often regarded as the first Arab woman ever to be appointed professor. Born in Nazareth, Odeh immigrated to Russia in 1914 where, in the early 1930s, she founded an institute of Arabic studies at the University of Moscow...

Stalemate in the Middle East peace process: in search of a way out

The US-brokered peace talks are close to collapse: Palestinians and Israelis are considering what will happen “the day after”. The latter is the title of a report released a few weeks ago by the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research...

A changing order in the Mideast: states, borders and peoples

On November 5, 1904, Leo Amery, later an undersecretary in David Lloyd George’s national government, pointed out to Arthur Balfour that it would have been impossible to put an end to the Anglo-Russian rivalry in Asia until “all those regions have been fully developed and till our boundaries march side by side in the same fashion that boundaries do in Europe”...

Beyond the Egyptian paradox. A conversation with Roger Owen

One of the most influential legacies left by French sociologist Émile Durkheim is that revolutions are in themselves unable to make any significant difference: every deep change takes place through the cumulation of long-term processes of social development...

The roots and context of the Syrian disaster: sharing responsibilities

There are three major questions at issue in the current Syrian tragedy. First, what has triggered this disaster? Second, which phase are we currently facing? Finally, what are the possible solutions?...