Doruk Ergun

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Doruk Ergun

Doruk Ergun is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies (EDAM) in Istanbul, where he works on issues concerning Turkey’s security and foreign relations.

This author wrote:

The July 15 coup attempt: the aftermath and Turkish democracy

What started out as an ordinary Friday evening, on July 15, abruptly turned into a night of confusion and dread as a clique within the Turkish Armed Forces tried to stage a coup d’état...

The Turkish Prime Minister’s fall from grace

On May 5, Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu announced he would leave office and his role as the leader the Justice and Development Party (AKP), many months before completing the four-year mandate given to his government after the November 2015 elections...

Turkey’s search for friends in an unfriendly neighborhood

For much of its history, modern Turkey followed a non-interventionist and pro-status quo foreign policy. Save for the Cypriot issue, where Ankara intervened in 1974 due to ethnic, political, humanitarian and strategic considerations, the country’s use of military force abroad has been limited to NATO and UN missions, and to combating the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) in Iraq...

Turkey and the Kurds: A storm is brewing once again

After several years of relative calm, Turkey finds itself once again in the clutches of an escalating cycle of violence with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)...

Inside the “New Turkey”: not so dazzling

During his campaign to become Turkey’s first president elected by popular vote, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan promised a “new Turkey” resting on four pillars: furthering the country’s democracy, political and societal normalization, welfare and becoming one of the leading nations of the world.. So far, the picture has not been so rosy...

Turkey on Syria: change of stance but no change of heart

ISIS’s offensive in Kobane, along the Syrian border, has presented the Turkish leadership with a major dilemma, namely whether ISIS or Syria’s Democratic Union Party (PYD) – an ideological affiliate of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), a terror organization that has plagued Turkey for over three decades – was the lesser evil...

Erdoğan as President: implications for Turkish foreign policy

With a widely expected outcome, the Turkish people voted for the first time in the history of the Republic to elect the country’s President, who was elected by the Parliament in the past...

The deterioration of Iraq and its impact on Turkey

Turks were struck dumb over the news that ISIS had taken Mosul by storm...

Turkish views on the Syrian civil war

Among the countries that bare the spillovers of the Syrian war, Turkey is one of the most heavily affected. Yet the public and the government have different takes on the issue. While Ankara is one of the biggest opponents of Assad, the majority of the public is against the government’s involvement in Syria and has trouble accommodating the scores of refugees that have poured into Turkey...